Recent News // Alaska’s Campaign to Get Faster Internet to Its Most Remote Schools — Where Even Dial-Up Is a Luxury

Wednesday, December 16, 2015
The only way to visit the Pribilof School District is by airplane. On two islands — St. Paul and St. George — 800 miles from Anchorage, Alaska in the south Bering Sea, the district encompasses two schools with a combined 78 pupils from kindergarten to 12th grade.
 
The Pribilofs, once called the Northern Fur Seal Islands, are home to the Aleuts, a native people that once hunted the fur seals and have survived generations of hardship, from slavery by the Russians, to forced relocation during World War II to oppressive control by the U.S. federal government.
 
Now the children of this dwindling tribe find themselves struggling with a different kind of deprivation —  a daunting lack of reliable and affordable Internet that is putting 21st-century education technology beyond their reach. It’s an advantage readily available to millions of students in the Lower 48 and the kind of transformative learning tools that these isolated children so sorely need.